Mujeres posan con las axilas sin depilar para celebrar su belleza natural

Decenas de mujeres se unieron para romper con las normas preestablecidas de belleza popular.

Gente revolucionaria hay de todo tipo, y un ejemplo de ello es el fotógrafo Ben Hopper que desde hace años empezó a exponer la belleza desde un ángulo irreverente y contestatario a través de sus fotografías.

Ben invita a romper el tabú de las axilas con vellos en las mujeres, con esta campaña envía un mensaje para que se vea como un hecho normal. 

LA ACLAMADA BELLEZA NATURAL

Hopper, 37 años y originario de Reino Unido, ha iniciado con el movimiento fotografiando a docenas de mujeres velludas en su estudio de Hackney. para el proyecto llamado Natural-Beauty.

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JoJo Pearson (@lemonadejar), photographed & written in July (2017). (Full set on my Patreon) Text posted as parts in the comments due to IG character limit. (1/2) “I stopped shaving because I have extremely sensitive skin and my hair grows quite fast. It began to get painful because of the spots and cuts from shaving so regularly and it didn’t even look nice because of how rashy my underarms were. I started to question why I had to put my skin through this every day, even though all the men that I knew weren’t expected to. I realised how ridiculous it was and from then on only shaved when I actually wanted to (which is very rare and has become less and less). ⠀ At first I felt like I needed to hide my hair all the time in case someone saw and made a horrible comment. But after going out plenty of times without shaving I gained a lot more confidence. I feel more in tune with my body now that I’m not damaging my skin and taking more care of it. I also feel empowered by not shaving. For so long I had conformed to society’s expectations of what a woman should look like and I finally realised that I was beautiful regardless of whether I shave or not. I really inspired myself in a way, it can take a lot to go against what everyone sees as beautiful and normal, but I’m proud of myself for doing it.”

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La mayoría de estas imágenes tomadas entre 2016 y 2018 han demostrado que no es necesario cumplir con los estándares de belleza demandados por la sociedad para lucir atractivas.

Justamente eso es lo que defiende el proyecto, la belleza alternativa y natural que rompe con los ideales modernos aunque parezca una locura lucir orgullosa de una axila ‘peluda’.

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@kyotocatnip for ‘Natural Beauty’. Photographed June 2017, written March 2018. Text posted as parts in the comments due to IG character limit. ⠀ (1/2) I stopped shaving completely when I was a teenager because of two instances. The first? I got tired of all the time wasted on maintenance and the discomfort that came with it. The second was when I went on a few multiple week-long backpacking trips; it would have been extremely inconvenient to spend hours ripping my hair out, so I let things grow. Being so close to nature let me dive deeper into and re-examine the relationship with myself and the world, acting as a mirror. In nature, there is wild; it is as beautiful as it is untamed. How could it be anything other than that? ⠀ I felt so relieved and free when I let it grow out. It felt like being able to breathe. It was incredibly comfortable too. I felt a confidence and boldness returning, like I was replenishing some kind of primal power. ⠀ People respond to it differently all the time. There are very encouraging/positive reactions—women who have messaged me to thank me for changing their mind and pushing them to challenge their motives/experiment with growing their body hair. Then there are people that start to fetishize it, which can be strange. ⠀ People revere my decision as a feminist and bold political statement, which is ironic, considering how almost everybody has some kind of body hair. It is also funny because I am lazy and keeping it is the path of least resistance.

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“Me gusta la belleza natural en una mujer. Creo que puede ser muy hermoso y en las circunstancias de empoderamiento y sexy. Necesitas una actitud para ser una mujer con axilas peludas en la actualidad.” comentó Hopper.

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Kyotocat for ‘Natural Beauty’. June 2017. Words continue in comments due to IG character limit. ⠀ (1/2) “I stopped shaving completely when I was a teenager because of two instances. The first? I got tired of all the time wasted on maintenance and the discomfort that came with it. The second was when I went on a few multiple week-long backpacking trips; it would have been extremely inconvenient to spend hours ripping my hair out, so I let things grow. Being so close to nature let me dive deeper into and re-examine the relationship with myself and the world, acting as a mirror. In nature, there is wild; it is as beautiful as it is untamed. How could it be anything other than that? ⠀ I felt so relieved and free when I let it grow out. It felt like being able to breathe. It was incredibly comfortable too. I felt a confidence and boldness returning, like I was replenishing some kind of primal power. ⠀ People respond to it differently all the time. There are very encouraging/positive reactions—women who have messaged me to thank me for changing their mind and pushing them to challenge their motives/experiment with growing their body hair. Then there are people that start to fetishize it, which can be strange. ⠀ People revere my decision as a feminist and bold political statement, which is ironic, considering how almost everybody has some kind of body hair. It is also funny because I am lazy and keeping it is the path of least resistance. There are people who are exceptionally rude and who speak from fear. People who say it’s dirty and that I must be a man. The more important questions to ponder are rather why and how do we live in a culture/society that has deemed it acceptable for certain people to have body hair, and unacceptable for others? Isn’t it absurd that it is socially acceptable for humans to have lots of hair on their head, but not on other parts of their same body? Isn’t it ridiculous and ironic that what grows naturally on its own is seen as unnatural? How did we get here?”

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Cuenta que al informarse y leer sobre el porqué la presión sobre las mujeres para mantener su axila sin vellos viene de marcas de belleza tales como Gillette, en necesidad de más público.

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Darian Koszinski, circus artist. Photographed for “Natural Beauty”. May 11, 2018. Words posted as parts in the comments due to IG character limit. ⠀ (1/2) “Shaving, epilating or waxing hurts. I was tired of suffering, trying to adapt to the image of a ‘beautiful young woman’ society is selling us. Everybody told me to shave. As a teenager, it’s a huge subject among girls; where do you shave? What method are you using? It takes so much time and costs so much money (the majority of hair removal products are also not recyclable). All of these reasons coming one after another motivated me to stop shaving. I would often have irritated skin after shaving and being a very sporty person, the sweat and the friction of my clothes would cause pain. The worst thing was having sex on the second day after shaving my vulva. I didn't understand why women would suffer and waste so much time on hiding who they really are. ⠀ It was hard to accept my new image. I am an ash blond, but have BLACK hairs on my legs, armpits and vulva. My legs were the worst; in addition to the long black hair, they’re quite muscly. It made it harder to accept my masculine look but I had a feeling that I needed to stop shaving so I could feel more like myself - accept myself as I really am. Nowadays I love my hair. It definitely makes me feel stronger and in balance with myself. I like touching it and showing it. I sometimes even like to use it to provoke. I kind of enjoy the moments in the Metro; when people seem disturbed looking at my legs. I always hope other women and men can find us, naturally hairy women, as an inspiration. ⠀ There are all kind of reactions - people talking behind my back, curious friends asking for the reason, others who tell me that they love it and others making fun of it, or being disapproving. When I was 17 I had the idea that if I stopped shaving I’d only meet people who really like me and don’t care about these superficial norms of society. It worked out!”

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"No quiero decir que quiero que las mujeres empiecen a dejar crecer el pelo de la  axila, solo creo que es una posibilidad y que la gente no debería descartarla. Me gustaría que la gente solo cuestionara todo.” explicó.

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Jessica Hargreaves for ‘Natural Beauty’. October 2018. ⠀ “I originally stopped shaving maybe five or six years ago, really for physical reasons at first – my skin has Keratosis pilaris (those little bumps, like ‘chicken skin’) and so shaving was a nightmare, particularly on my legs. I would get the most terrible ingrown hairs, to the point that most of the hairs on my legs would have to be picked out with tweezers or they’d turn into painful spots. The same would happen on my vulva if I ever dared to shave, and eventually started on my underarms too. I tried a few different hair removal methods but nothing really worked, and eventually, I started to feel that my body was protesting, so I just stopped. ⠀ When I stopped shaving I finally felt free of my body’s reaction to hair removal and all the pain and hours spent exfoliating, just for my skin to look terrible anyway. At first, I wasn’t sure about how it looked but I’ve really grown to love my body hair, and I’ve never had any complaints from people whose opinion I care about. ⠀ I worked in a bar when I first stopped shaving, so I had some shocked reactions from some of the (male) customers and regulars, I think it was just a bit before hairy armpits (on women) became more common to see, so some of them were disgusted reactions, but honestly I felt like it was a pretty good misogyny filter. Most people don’t even notice, some people like it. ⠀ I did start to feel like it was a feminist action too — men have body hair and don’t tend to have any issues with it from others, or themselves. But really I think a lot of it was just that I’ve always been pretty boyish, never had much of a skincare routine and never really worn makeup (not that those things are bad or unfeminist!) just because those things don’t interest me much and aren’t on my radar – I’m not ‘feminine’ in that way, so hair removal just became another one of those things that I just didn’t feel made sense to me. I can’t be bothered.”

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O LO AMAS O LO ODIAS

Al principio se fueron fotografiadas amigas cercanas a Hopper que no temían dejar crecer un par de semanas el vello pero a medida que el movimiento crecía las mujeres se acercaban a él.

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“I stopped shaving my body hair as I realised that it is a choice, not a given. That it was unfair to have to spend so much extra time, sometimes money (if getting regular waxes) and energy in order to fulfil this conventional expectation to be hair free. This expectation seemed to be based entirely on my assigned biological gender, which was purely down to chance. Not choice. ⠀ At first, my 17-year-old self was exceptionally proud and liberated. Flashing my underarms and legs with a zesty vigour for pushing social boundaries. I still feel such a way often. However getting older, and becoming more of a ‘grown up woman’, so to speak, I have been more challenged wondering how it could affect others perception of me, mainly professionally. ⠀ Over the years I’ve had mixed responses. Some very gratifying, where other ‘women’ have expressed feeling inspired to stop removing their hair also. On several occasions ‘women’ have called me “so brave” and shared almost sorrowfully their personal inner conflict on the matter. I’ve had conversations with lovers and ‘male’ friends who claimed to find my body hair attractive, symbolic of freedom and nature; that they don’t even notice it/care. I mention this as I think that one of the biggest motivations to remove body hair is wanting to be considered sexually attractive. I’ve definitely also noticed what I think are looks of surprise in public places. But quite frankly I’m not surprised at that as despite becoming somewhat more acceptable, it is still pretty rare to see a ‘woman’ with hairy legs or a man with shaved armpits, for that matter. I too can find myself staring at unusual appearances.” ⠀ Charlot Conway for ‘Natural Beauty’. Photographed May 2018, written July 2018.

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Se expandió de mujeres de gran bretaña a distintas del extranjeros y en total han sido unos 45 temas que van de protestas contra la industria de de la belleza, normalizando un proceso natural.

Hopper también dijo que así como muchas personas han venido a él rápidamente a través de las redes sociales, muchos son de igual manera rápidos para juzgar.

Juzgan el aspecto de las modelos al ser demasiado flacas, o demasiado jóvenes, incluso con maquillaje cuando en realidad esa es la idea de Hopper.

Al presentar mujeres distintas, crea un contraste muchísimo más fuerte porque las personas no se esperan que una mujer bonita a simple vista, decida llevar con orgullo su axila velluda.

En la otra cara de la moneda está la historia de una mujer que con intenciones de llenar su ansias por verse "perfecta", se inyectó los labios, pero el resultado ciertamente no fue el que esperaba. 

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